Otago University Press (127)

Landfall 235

ISBN: 9781988531243

Publisher: Otago University Press

AWARDS & COMPETITIONS Results and winning essays from the 2018 Charles Brasch Young Writers’ Award, and judge’s report by Emma Neale. WRITERS Aimee-Jane And...


AWARDS & COMPETITIONS Results and winning essays from the 2018 Charles Brasch Young Writers’ Award, and judge’s report by Emma Neale. WRITERS Aimee-Jane Anderson-O’Connor, Nick Ascroft, Joseph Barbon, Airini Beautrais, Tony Beyer, Mark Broatch, Danny Bultitude, Brent Cantwell, Rachel Connor, Ruth Corkill, Mark Edgecombe, Lynley Edmeades, Johanna Emeney, Bonnie Etherington, Jess Fiebig, Meagan France, Kim Fulton, Isabel Haarhaus, Bernadette Hall, Michael Hall, Rebecca Hawkes, Aaron Horrell, Jac Jenkins, Erik Kennedy, Brent Kininmont, Wen-Juenn Lee, Zoë Meager, Alice Miller, Dave Moore, Art Nahill, Janet Newman, Charles Olsen, Joanna Preston, Jessie Puru, Jeremy Roberts, Derek Schulz, Sarah Scott, Charlotte Simmonds, Tracey Slaughter, Elizabeth Smither, Rachael Taylor, Lynette Thorstensen, James Tremlett, Tam Vosper, Dunstan Ward, Susan Wardell, Sugar Magnolia Wilson REVIEWS Landfall Review Online: books recently reviewed Chris Else on Moonshine Eggs by Russell Haley Stephanie Johnson on Decline and Fall on Savage Street by Fiona Farrell Owen Marshall on Tess by Kirsten McDougall Chris Tse on What Is Left Behind by Tom Weston; Rumpelstiltskin Blues by John Adams; Tales of the Waihorotiu by Carin Smeaton Ray Grover on Phoney Wars: New Zealand society in the Second World War by Stevan Eldred-Grigg with Hugh Eldred-Grigg Genevieve Scanlan on Hoard by Fleur Adcock; Field Notes by Mary Cresswell; Luminescent by Nina Powles Philip Temple on Edmund Hillary: A biography by Michael Gill Tom Brooking on Tōtara: A natural and cultural history by Philip Simpson Published with the assistance of Creative New Zealand


Bind: paperback


Dimensions: 165 x 215 mm


Publication Date: 01-05-2018


$30.00
Doctors in Denial : The forgotten women in the 'unfortunate experiment'

ISBN: 9780947522438

Author: Ronald Jones    Publisher: Otago University Press

When Dr Ron Jones joined the staff of National Women’s Hospital in Auckland in 1973 as a junior obstetrician and gynaecologist, Professor Herbert Green’s st...


When Dr Ron Jones joined the staff of National Women’s Hospital in Auckland in 1973 as a junior obstetrician and gynaecologist, Professor Herbert Green’s study into the natural history of carcinoma in-situ of the cervix (CIS) – later called ‘the unfortunate experiment’ – had been in progress for seven years. By the mid-1960s there was almost universal agreement among gynaecologists and pathologists worldwide that CIS was a precursor of cancer, requiring complete removal. Green, however, believed otherwise, and embarked on a study of women with CIS, without their consent, that involved merely observing, rather than definitively treating them. Many women subsequently developed cancer and some died. In 1984 Jones and senior colleagues Dr Bill McIndoe and Dr Jock McLean published a scientific paper that exposed the truth, and the disastrous outcome of Green’s experiment. In a public inquiry in 1987 Judge Sylvia Cartwright observed that an unethical experiment had been carried out in large numbers of women for over 20 years. Since that time there have been attempts to cast Green’s work in a more generous light. This rewriting of history has spurred Ron Jones to set the record straight by telling his personal story: a story of the unnecessary suffering of countless women, a story of professional arrogance and misplaced loyalties, and a story of doctors in denial of the truth.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 264


Dimensions: 150 x 230 mm


Publication Date: 20-02-2017


$39.95
To The Mountains

ISBN: 9781988531205

Authors: Laurence Fearnley, Paul Hersey    Publisher: Otago University Press

The air temperature was probably -35 degrees Celsius with wind chill. We couldn’t stand still for long. Our brains felt taxed and our bodies were running on e...


The air temperature was probably -35 degrees Celsius with wind chill. We couldn’t stand still for long. Our brains felt taxed and our bodies were running on empty. On the Football Field not far from the summit, Sue discovered a square of chocolate. We shared it, telling our bodies we didn’t need more. As we continued the descent, the air warmed and filled with oxygen. We began to encounter climbers heading up. Most knew who we were, incredulously asking: ‘are you the girls who slept on the summit’? – Karen McNeill, ‘A Ridge Too Far: The first female ascent of Denali’s Cassin Ridge’ A schoolgirl races from class to join a weekend trip to the hills. A mountaineering guide recalls his first weeks on the job during the 1920s. A young climber is shown the best route over the Main Divide by a big bull thar. A climbing party is bombarded by falling rock when Ruapehu suddenly erupts. A mountaineer pays tribute to the Māori guides from south Westland, while a fighter pilot tries to recapture an ascent of the Minarets from his tent in Nigeria during World War II. From the Darrans of Fiordland to Denali in Alaska, New Zealand climbers, both experienced and recreational, have captured their alpine experience in letters, journals, articles, memoirs, poems and novels. Drawing on 150 years of published and unpublished material, Laurence Fearnley and Paul Hersey, two top contemporary authors, have compiled a wide-ranging, fascinating and moving glimpse into New Zealand’s mountaineering culture and the people who write about it.


Bind: hardback


Pages: 372


Dimensions: 150 x 230 mm


Publication Date: 12-06-2018


$45.00
Artefacts of Encounter

ISBN: 9781877578694

Author: Nicholas Thomas    Publisher: Otago University Press

The Pacific artefacts and works of art collected during the three voyages of Captain James Cook and the navigators, traders and missionaries who followed him ar...


The Pacific artefacts and works of art collected during the three voyages of Captain James Cook and the navigators, traders and missionaries who followed him are of foundational importance for the study of art and culture in Oceania. These collections are representative not only of technologies or belief systems but of indigenous cultures at the formative stages of their modern histories, and exemplify Islanders’ institutions, cosmologies and social relationships. Recently, scholars from the Pacific and further afield, working with Pacific artefacts at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology in Cambridge (MAA), have set out to challenge and rethink some longstanding assumptions on their significance. The Cook voyage collection at the MAA is among the four or five most important in the world, containing over 200 of the 2000-odd objects with Cook voyage provenance that are dispersed throughout the world. The collection includes some 100 artefacts dating from Cook’s first voyage. This stunning book catalogues this collection, and its cutting-edge scholarship sheds new light on the significance of many artefacts of encounter. • Hundreds of sumptuous photographs of artefacts collected on the voyages of Captain Cook and by traders and missionaries who followed him • Cutting-edge scholarship • Large-format jacketed hardback


Bind: hardback


Pages: 348


Dimensions: 285 x 250 mm


Publication Date: 17-06-2016


Tag: History
$70.00
Edgeland

ISBN: 9781988531274

Author: David Eggleton    Publisher: Otago University Press

The poetry in David Eggleton’s new collection possesses an intensity and driven energy, using the poet’s recognisable signature oratory voice, strong in bea...


The poetry in David Eggleton’s new collection possesses an intensity and driven energy, using the poet’s recognisable signature oratory voice, strong in beat and measure, rooted in rich traditions of chant, lament and ode. Mashing together the lyrical and the slangy, celebrating local vernaculars while simultaneously plugged in to a global zeitgeist of technobabble and fake news, Eggleton recycles and ‘repurposes’ high visual culture and demotic aural culture. Edgeland offers a tragicomic and surreal skewering of the cons, swindles, posturings and flaws of damaged people on the make, dislocating the reader with high speed jinks and swerves. A satirical eye interrogates ‘data’, media bilge, opinion, social change, extreme experience, and worst-case-scenario extrapolations. A menagerie of vivid characters burst off the page – including the man who mistook the moon for a candy bar, instigators, prestidigitators, procurators, promulgators, Zorro and Governor Grey – alongside a survey of 35 types of beard, an ode to ooze, metadada, Gordon Ramsay’s pan-sizzled bull’s pizzle, a Baxterian moa, and various other waka jumpers hailing from Jafaville to Jack’s Blowhole. Edgeland is a dazzling display of polychromatic virtuosity, teeming with irrepressible wordplay, startling imagery and anarchic wit, from one of New Zealand’s best-loved poets


Bind: paperback


Pages: 112


Dimensions: 150 x 230 mm


$27.50
Unfortunate Folk

ISBN: 9781877276095

Publisher: Otago University Press

From electro-convulsive therapy to epilepsy, from criminal lunacy to community care, 'Unfortunate Folk': Essays on Mental Health Treatment, 1863-1992, opens win...


From electro-convulsive therapy to epilepsy, from criminal lunacy to community care, 'Unfortunate Folk': Essays on Mental Health Treatment, 1863-1992, opens windows on to the history of mental health treatment in New Zealand. It is one of the few books available on the history of mental health in New Zealand.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 304


Dimensions: 150 x 230 mm


Tag:
$39.95
The Lives of Coat Hangers

ISBN: 9781927322376

Author: Sudesh Mishra    Publisher: Otago University Press

In Sudesh Mishra’s new collection the opening poem, ‘The Capacious Muse’, acts as a manifesto or declaration of intent. It’s a sequence of aphoristic se...


In Sudesh Mishra’s new collection the opening poem, ‘The Capacious Muse’, acts as a manifesto or declaration of intent. It’s a sequence of aphoristic sentences that begins: ‘The muse will not proscribe.’ In other words, this poet will not rule anything out as the fit subject for a poem. Sudesh Mishra is a philosophical poet, one preoccupied not only with how meaning is made, but with how meaning is manifested in the modern world. His poetry is rich in the truths revealed by humble, humdrum objects, as in the title poem, ‘The Lives of Coat Hangers’: They wait for a latch to raise an eyebrow, For a shadow to step in from the light. They long to be held in the arms of a coat … Subtle, witty, linguistically adept and internationally well travelled, Sudesh Mishra is a poet whose range of reference traverses global culture. An ambitious and accomplished writer, one able to brilliantly reinvent language, myth and metaphor, his fifth collection confirms him as a major poetic voice in the South Pacific. … a poet with imagination to burn – Murray Bramwell, Adelaide Review Mishra’s development as a poet shows in the restrained, formal, technical brilliance of the poems –Briar Wood, The Contemporary Pacific


Bind: paperback


Pages: 144


Dimensions: 150 x 235 mm


Publication Date: 29-01-2016


$25.00
The Prison Diary of A.C. Barrington

ISBN: 9781927322314

Author: John Pratt    Publisher: Otago University Press

A.C. (Archie) Barrington was a leading New Zealand pacifist during World War 2. Incarcerated in Mount Crawford Prison for his beliefs in 1941, he kept an illici...


A.C. (Archie) Barrington was a leading New Zealand pacifist during World War 2. Incarcerated in Mount Crawford Prison for his beliefs in 1941, he kept an illicit diary, scrawled in the margins of books. Many years later his son John happened across the diary and painstakingly reconstructed it. Such documents are exceptionally rare – until recent times prisoners were not allowed to keep any record of their experiences and many were illiterate anyway. Barrington vividly and compellingly recorded the squalid, rundown conditions, monotonous and exhausting labour, the intense cold from which there was little protection, and the strategies he and his fellow pacifists adopted to enable them to cope with prison life. John Pratt has edited the diary and provides a fascinating commentary on the issues it raises in relation to prison life then and now. He also addresses a fundamental question – what were Barrington and his like doing in prison, when similar expressions of dissent would almost certainly have been ignored in Australia or Britain? Why was New Zealand, with its ‘fair go’, egalitarian reputation, so intolerant and punitive? Pratt chronicles a history of intolerance, suspicion and deep-seated antipathies that may go some way towards explaining the current penal saturation in this ‘friendly’ land.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 280


Dimensions: 150 x 230 mm


Publication Date: 19-02-2016


Tags: Biography   New Zealand   History
$39.95
Pushing Boundaries

ISBN: 9781927322178

Author: Hugh Morrison    Publisher: Otago University Press

We know a lot about the early missionaries who came to New Zealand from 1814 and how Christianity developed through their complex interactions with Māori. Less...


We know a lot about the early missionaries who came to New Zealand from 1814 and how Christianity developed through their complex interactions with Māori. Less well known are the ways in which settler churches of Aotearoa New Zealand reached out to engage in missionary activity in other parts of the world. Pushing Boundaries is the first book-length attempt to tell the story of the evolution of overseas missionary activity by New Zealand’s Protestant churches from the early nineteenth century up to World War II. In this thought-provoking book, Hugh Morrison outlines how and why missions became important to colonial churches – the theological and social reasons churches supported missions, how their ideas were shaped, and what motivated individual New Zealanders to leave these shores to devote their lives elsewhere. Secondly, he connects this local story to some larger historical themes – of gender, culture, empire, childhood and education. This book argues that understanding the overseas missionary activity of Protestant churches and groups can contribute to a more general understanding of how New Zealand has developed as a society and nation.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 340


Dimensions: 150 x 230 mm


Publication Date: 19-02-2016


$45.00
Rushing For Gold

ISBN: 9781877578540

Authors: Lloyd Carpenter, Lyndon Fraser    Publisher: Otago University Press

Rushing for Gold is the first book to take a trans-Tasman look at the nineteenth-century phenomenon that was the gold rushes in Australia and New Zealand. It ex...


Rushing for Gold is the first book to take a trans-Tasman look at the nineteenth-century phenomenon that was the gold rushes in Australia and New Zealand. It explores links between the rushes, particularly those in Victoria and Otago, to show that they were strongly intertwined affairs. The book brings together contributions from both experienced and newly emergent researchers, who together provide a close examination of miners’ migration patterns, ethnicities and merchant networks. The contributors’ insightful analyses and narrative accounts of the places, commerce and heritage of the rushes reveal a pantheon of characters, from merchants, hoteliers, financiers and policemen to vagrants, sly-groggers and entertainers, not to mention women, all of whom prompted and populate the mythology of the era, which this book does much to unravel and rewrite.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 344


Dimensions: 150 x 230 mm


Publication Date: 18-03-2016


Tags: History   New Zealand
$45.00
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