NZ (History) (72)

Pressing On : The story of New Zealand newspapers, 1921-2000

ISBN: 9781991164452

Author: Ian F Grant    Publisher: Fraser Books

In 1920, when Lasting Impressions, the first volume in this history of New Zealand newspapers ended, the large number of newspapers in the country were the prof...


In 1920, when Lasting Impressions, the first volume in this history of New Zealand newspapers ended, the large number of newspapers in the country were the profitable, well-respected vehicles of nearly all the news from around the world and around the corner welcomed into households in the largest cities and smallest hamlets. Newspapers were also the principal means by which manufacturers and merchants sold their products and services to people. This strange amalgam – provision of a public service in an essentially commercial operation – worked, for the most part, very successfully. All that changed over the next 80 years. There were ownership changes to what had been, both large and small, mainly family businesses. Radio, television and the Internet severely disrupted the press’s virtual monopoly of the news. The commercial model that allowed newspapers to function successfully was severely disrupted. Foreign owners, without the same commitment to New Zealand society, entered and began to dominate the local market. By 2000, the New Zealand newspaper market had changed forever – and in ways that put its very survival at risk. Pressing On is the story of how and why this happened.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 680


Dimensions: 170 x 240 mm


Publication Date: 16-04-2024


$69.50
Change and Context : Another Look at the Treaty of Waitangi

ISBN: 9780473649340

Author: Roger Evans   

The Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti) is the founding document of our national identity. Traditionally understood as conveying full sovereignty to the Crown, today...


The Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti) is the founding document of our national identity. Traditionally understood as conveying full sovereignty to the Crown, today it is viewed as creating some form of co-sovereign partnership. Which is correct? If we are to ‘Honour the Treaty,’ we must first understand it. To promote an incorrect reading is to dishonour the Treaty. To write the wrong interpretation into a national Constitution would be an enduring mistake. This book examines the Treaty in its historical context relative to the Declaration of Independence. It assesses the contextual use of the terms rangatiratanga and kāwanatanga in those documents, reviews the idealism and intent of the Treaty of Waitangi, reflects on how it was understood in 1840, and considers how and why it fell short in practical application. Having reviewed the impact of colonial policies, the book then presents an evidence-based challenge to modern ideas of co-sovereignty and partnership. Finally, it asks how we can honour the Treaty going forward in the way its signatories intended, as different cultures comprising one nation.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 214


Dimensions: 152 x 229 mm


Publication Date: 07-11-2022


$35.00
Going The Distance : 100 years of Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu The Correspondence School

ISBN: 9780473616298

Author: Gael Woods    Publisher: Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu 2022

From a sole teacher to New Zealand’s largest school, Going the Distance tells the 100-year story of how a correspondence scheme, a “doubtful experiment” b...


From a sole teacher to New Zealand’s largest school, Going the Distance tells the 100-year story of how a correspondence scheme, a “doubtful experiment” became the Department of Education’s Correspondence School and later through a series of remarkable transformations - Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu, which now enrols more than 25,000 students a year and is the country’s largest Māori school. The Minister of Education, Chris Hipkins, has described Te Kura’s work with the country’s most vulnerable students as one of the great untold stories of the New Zealand education system. Back in 1922, the first teacher, Miss Janet MacKenzie, was expecting to enrol about 25 “backblocks”students, but such was the clamour for education that the numbers rocketed with 100 on the roll by the time lessons began. By the end of the year, there were almost 350 pupils, with every lesson, every correction, every letter to pupil and parent handwritten by the sole teacher. The book follows the school’s history through the appointments of several headmasters, all of whom were determined that the pupils should have a “real school”. They held exhibitions of students work (attended by many dignitaries of the day), formed a multitude of clubs, established a museum, built an extensive library, sent out teachers into isolated districts. These visiting teacher reached their remote pupils through an astonishing range of transport, including by dinghy, horseback and on gun carriers. Residential schools were also held every year where the “corrie kids” would spend a month with their schoolmates, who they got to know through the pages of their annual magazine, the Postman. A lot of the story is related by the pupils themselves in the prose and verse they contributed to the Postman, from 1928 to 2002. There are also many comments and descriptions of the school through annual reports, in speeches by Governors General, Prime Ministers from Michael Joseph Savage to David Lange, as well as Ministers of Education, and Government agencies. In the book’s foreword, the Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, a former Te Kura student herself, says Going the Distance is not only a history of the school and the New Zealand education, but is also the story of how New Zealanders lived in times past, what they thought about, what was important to them, and even what they laughed about. And she says it tells how Te Kura has been called on in times of national crises, such as the devastating polio epidemics of the 1940s right up to providing its expertise in online learning during the COVID-19 global pandemic. For its first 60 years, the school was truly a national icon – a model of innovative educational programmes, a national broadcaster of educational programmes, and a provider of lessons to a broad range of students from early childhood to adults. However, the school’s fortunes begin to change dramatically in the 1980s. Its traditional base of remote children declined, and a new student profile began to dominate - students, alienated, often expelled, from their own school, often Māori, and most problematically, a type of student least suited to learn on their own through distance education. The school said it had been given a major social problem by government agencies without the additional resourcing needed to do the job, and was then criticised publicly by other branches of the government for failing to achieve the impossible. For many years the school struggled to find a solution, and it wasn’t until the appointment of the current CE Mike Hollings that the school – now Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu – has been able to tackle “the impossible”. In the words of the latest ERO report on Te Kura (December 2021), it has raised the achievement of the most vulnerable and “at risk” ākonga (student) and at a time when increasing numbers of rangatahi (young people) are falling out of the education system. Te Kura has been part of the education system in Aotearoa New Zealand for 100 years. Just as it was crucial in its early years, providing lessons to those unable to access schooling, today it is providing the opportunity to tens of thousands of students who would otherwise miss out on an education. Te Kura is just as relevant – and needed – all these years later.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 252


Dimensions: 210 x 298 mm


Publication Date: 30-09-2022


$49.95
Chathams Resurgent : How the islanders overcame 150 years of misrule

ISBN: 9781991164421

Author: Hugh Rennie    Publisher: Fraser Books

In 1990 those living on Chatham Islands/ Rekohu/ Wharekauri faced crisis. Annexed to New Zealand by a London proclamation, the Islands had experienced 150 years...


In 1990 those living on Chatham Islands/ Rekohu/ Wharekauri faced crisis. Annexed to New Zealand by a London proclamation, the Islands had experienced 150 years of New Zealand control. Years of muddlement, some good intentions, financial waste exploitation and theft, and failure to deliver democratic rights and basic infrastructure. The after-effects of Rogernomics had produced a government decision to “walk away”. Such infrastructure as existed would be abandoned, with the Islanders left to save themselves, or fail and leave. How could it have come to this? The first part of this book details the improbable constitutional history of the Islands to 1990. It includes gunship visits to enforce rule; support of Maori for Tohu, Te Whiti, and Parihaka pacifism; a revolt where the magistrate’s authority crumbled to nothing; and many more remarkable events. In 1990, Islanders rose to the challenge of their new independence from Wellington. Their independent community co-operative, the Chatham Islands Enterprise Trust, soon flourished. Today it operates electricity, ports, shipping, and other companies; uses a portfolio of fishing quota to support on-Island fishers, and supports private Island businesses. The second part of this book tells how this was achieved. This book will be welcomed by those interested in these or any islands. Equally, those wanting to know more about the most curious parts of the history of government in Aotearoa New Zealand, or just all who enjoy a story of improbable success.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 380


Dimensions: 170 x 240 mm


Publication Date: 10-11-2022


$60.00
Aftermaths: Colonialism Violence and Memory in Australia New Zealand and the Pacific

ISBN: 9781990048449

Author: Wanhalla et el    Publisher: Otago University Press

Aftermaths explores the life-changing intergenerational effects of colonial violence in Aotearoa New Zealand, Australia and the Pacific. The settings of these a...


Aftermaths explores the life-changing intergenerational effects of colonial violence in Aotearoa New Zealand, Australia and the Pacific. The settings of these accessible, illustrated short essays range from Ōrākau pā in the Waikato to the Kimberleys in northwest Australia, from orphanages in Fiji to the ancestral lands of the Wiyot Tribe in Northern California. Story by story, this collection powerfully reveals the living legacy of historical events, showing how they have been remembered (and misremembered) within families and communities into the present day.


Bind: paperback


Dimensions: 170 x 240 x 20 mm


Publication Date: 14-04-2023


Tags: Education   History   NZ (History)   New Zealand
$50.00
The Illside of Town : Auckland Graffiti 2004-2011

ISBN: 9780473650889

Author: N Hazlett   

At the turn of the century, Auckland City's graffiti scene was thriving. The streets were constantly evolving with active graffiti artists pushing everything fr...


At the turn of the century, Auckland City's graffiti scene was thriving. The streets were constantly evolving with active graffiti artists pushing everything from tags to large scale productions, with the wall's showcasing who was getting up, and a reminder of who once was. When New Zealand was selected to host the Rugby World Cup in 2011, plans were made to clean up the streets in preparation for thousands of incoming international visitors. In the 5 year build up to the tournament, Auckland City Council spent over 19 million taxpayer dollars buffing it's city streets, motorways and train lines. Years of Auckland's graffiti history was wiped out in exchange for lifeless grey walls. The lllside Of Town takes a look back into Auckland's graffiti landscape between 2004 - 2011, while the city streets were alive with colour, culture and creativity.


Bind: hardback


Pages: 212


Dimensions: 290 x 230 mm


Publication Date: 31-12-2022


$110.00
From Crime to Care : The history of abortion in Aotearoa New Zealand

ISBN: 9780473663063

Author: Felicity Goodyear-Smith    Publisher: Verity Press

From Crime to Care presents the history of abortion in Aotearoa New Zealand from pre-colonial times to the present, weaving in stories and experiences from key ...


From Crime to Care presents the history of abortion in Aotearoa New Zealand from pre-colonial times to the present, weaving in stories and experiences from key people on both sides of the debate. After the first abortion clinic opened in 1974 there were protests and pickets, and the issue shaped our politics in the 1970s. Moral crusaders, activists, legislators, abortion-providers and many others put their reputations and sometimes their lives on the line to do what they thought was right. The abortion struggle serves as an illustration of our changing political and social landscape, with a public move from conservative towards more liberal values. Finally, after 180 years, abortion in Aotearoa is a health rather than a criminal concern. However, the issue continues to divide people, and events in the United States have shown how quickly change can occur, with their Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade and several states banning abortions.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 254


Dimensions: 152 x 229 mm


Publication Date: 09-02-2023


$39.95
Speargrass : Growing up on a 1940s farm near Arrowtown New Zealand

ISBN: 9780473665937

Author: Hilary Capper   

An extraordinary and evocative memoir. Hillary's recall and attention to detail highlight the places and people that were important, including the Otago settlem...


An extraordinary and evocative memoir. Hillary's recall and attention to detail highlight the places and people that were important, including the Otago settlements of Arrowtown, Queenstown, Glenorchy, Kinloch and Dunedin. Central to this story is how living on the farm in the immediate post-war period shaped family life. Respect for her parents’ efforts to provide the best possible life for them all in the face of considerable social and economic pressures shines through in this remarkable account. Hilary’s recall of her time at Arrowtown School will resonate with people who attended similar schools. The memoir traces the marriage of her parents and the differences in their respective family backgrounds and social expectations. Dunedin and her mother’s family maritime backdrop is explored, as is the relevance of Routeburn, Woodbine, and Earnslaw Stations. Brought to life are the ways the seasons shaped people’s daily living, making the most of limited facilities and creating entertainment. Highlighted is the role of the lake steamer, TSS Earnslaw. This book will appeal to anyone with a connection to the area as well as all those with an interest in a unique time and place in New Zealand’s rich history.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 213


Publication Date: 28-02-2023


$35.00
Mr Rolland: Something of an Artist

ISBN: 9780646824253

Author: Anne Rowland   

Adam Rolland was born in Edinburgh in 1841 but emigrated to Otago with his parents and siblings on the Alpine in 1859. He documented the journey and this intere...


Adam Rolland was born in Edinburgh in 1841 but emigrated to Otago with his parents and siblings on the Alpine in 1859. He documented the journey and this interest and skill with drawing and watercolour continued through his life, and even provided employment. This book focuses on a group of watercolours that remained in the family until they were donated to the Hocken Library in Dunedin in 2019. These images of the journey and Adam's life in Central Otago on a pastoral station have been put into context by the family story and other images from archives and museums


Bind: paperback


Pages: 138


Dimensions: 242 x 246 x 15 mm


Publication Date: 02-02-2023


$50.00
Ahuahu: A conservation journey in Aotearoa New Zealand

ISBN: 9781988503264

Author: David Towns    Publisher: Canterbury University Press

Aotearoa New Zealand is renowned among biologists worldwide for spectacular ecological restoration work over the last 50 years, through advances in pest eradica...


Aotearoa New Zealand is renowned among biologists worldwide for spectacular ecological restoration work over the last 50 years, through advances in pest eradication and native species translocation. This book documents the development of these world-leading technologies. It uses examples from throughout the country, but has a special focus on one island group – the Mercury islands off Coromandel, of which Ahuahu (Great Mercury Island) is the largest. The story is told through the eyes of pioneer conservation biologist David Towns, who was there from the start. It is a story of triumphs and setbacks, of opportunity and innovation, of teamwork and emerging bicultural collaboration. Today, all seven islands of the Mercury group are free of mammalian pests, providing a haven to native plants and animals. This book is the story of how that was made possible.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 384


Dimensions: 210 x 280 x 15 mm


Publication Date: 16-01-2023


$79.99
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