Fiction & Literature (224)

Waitapu

ISBN: 9780994118615

Author: Helen Waaka    Publisher: Escalator Press

Beneath a range of mountains lies the rural town of Waitapu. Here, sisters Ruby and Rowena reconnect, Mereata feels her tīpuna like a breath on the back of her...


Beneath a range of mountains lies the rural town of Waitapu. Here, sisters Ruby and Rowena reconnect, Mereata feels her tīpuna like a breath on the back of her neck and Harriet goes missing from the rest home. With a cast of lively characters, this collection of 18 short stories cracks open the image of rural tranquillity, to reveal the heartbreak and kindness of everyday lives. Finalist, Ngā Kupu Ora Awards, 2016 Helen Waaka was the winner of the 2011 Pikihuia Award for Best Short Story Written in English. With this collection she asserts herself as a perceptive and compelling story teller.


Bind: paperback


$30.00
Walking to Jutland Street

ISBN: 9781988531182

Author: Michael Steven    Publisher: Otago University Press

Walking to Jutland Street is the impressive first book-length collection by up-and-coming Auckland-based poet Michael Steven. The title refers to Dunedin’s in...


Walking to Jutland Street is the impressive first book-length collection by up-and-coming Auckland-based poet Michael Steven. The title refers to Dunedin’s industrial wharf precinct where some of the poet’s friends shared a flat in 2010. A poem about friendship in the face of the other, ‘Walking to Jutland Street’ vividly recreates their evening ‘constitutional’ from the flat via the bridge over train tracks to the city and back, with its inebriated, surreal, sometimes nightmarish inhabitants. Other poems deliver snapshots of the human condition through bizarre personalities such as the subject of ‘Dropped Pin: Jollie Street’, ‘a man who proclaimed to function / best in a state close to coma’. Still others are tender love poems, travel poems (in 2016 the poet slept in the last bedroom of explorer Vasco da Gama), poems about family or childhood memory. A poet of gritty, day-to-day urban New Zealand reality (whether depicting teenage drug dealing, alcoholics or the night shelter), Steven is equally a writer steeped in literary tradition, Buddhist mysticism and world-historical narrative. His is a voice that aspires to capture quotidian experience or personality as a phenomenon implicitly of all times and places. In this pursuit, his literary cousins are Olds, Orr, Mitchell, Dickson, Johnson and Baxter.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 80


Dimensions: 150 x 230 mm


Publication Date: 20-03-2018


$27.50
Charles Brasch Journals 1958-1973

ISBN: 9781988531144

Author: Charles Brasch    Publisher: Otago University Press

This third and final volume of Charles Brasch’s compelling private journals covers the years from when he was 48 to his death at 64. By the 1960s, Brasch, tho...


This third and final volume of Charles Brasch’s compelling private journals covers the years from when he was 48 to his death at 64. By the 1960s, Brasch, though very private by temperament, was a reluctant public figure, especially as editor of Landfall – indisputably the country’s leading cultural quarterly (he eventually quit as editor after 20 years). He was also becoming a highly regarded poet, with eventually six books (one posthumous) to his name. Behind the scenes Brasch was increasingly important as an art collector and as patron and benefactor; the Burns, Hodgkins and Mozart Fellowships – for writers, artists and composers respectively – which he helped anonymously to found and fund, all began in this period. Among his friends Brasch counted most of the country’s leading artists, writers and intellectuals including Sargeson, McCahon, McCormick, Stead, the Pauls, the Woollastons, the Baxters, Lilburn, Beaglehole, Angus, Oliver, Bensemann, Lusk, Frame and Dallas. These near contemporaries were joined by the talented young, many met as contributors to Landfall – including Gee, Cross, Shadbolt, Duggan, O’Sullivan, Hotere, Tuwhare, Caselberg, Middleton and Manhire. Brasch’s lively and sometimes acerbic accounts of such people are a fascinating aspect of his journals. Behind the esteemed poet, editor and public intellectual, however, was a sensitive and often angst-ridden man, who confided to his journals (and poems) the emotional roller-coaster of his private life, especially his endlessly frustrated search for love. Presented here are deep attachments to both men and women, including Andrew Packard (a visiting English zoologist) and Margaret Scott, widow of Harry Scott with whom Brasch had also been in love. Late in life his strong involvement with an elderly Jewish émigrée, Moli Zimmerman, adds another surprising layer to the complex and lovable man his journals reveal. Brasch’s journals will change forever the perception and understanding of an outstanding New Zealander and of the era to which he contributed so much.


Bind: hardback


Pages: 694


Dimensions: 170 x 245 mm


Publication Date: 20-04-2018


$59.95
The Expatriate Myth

ISBN: 9781988531175

Author: Helen Bones    Publisher: Otago University Press

Many New Zealand writers in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century travelled extensively or lived overseas for a time, and they often led very interest...


Many New Zealand writers in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century travelled extensively or lived overseas for a time, and they often led very interesting lives. The received wisdom is that they were forced to leave these colonial backblocks in search of literary inspiration and publishing opportunities. In The Expatriate Myth, Helen Bones presents a challenge to this conventional understanding, based on detailed historical and empirical research. Was it actually necessary for them to leave to find success? How prevalent was expatriatism among New Zealand writers? Did their experiences fit the usual tropes about expatriatism and exile? Were they fleeing an oppressive society lacking in literary opportunity? In the field of literary studies, scholars are often consumed with questions about ‘national’ literature and ‘what it means to be a New Zealander’. And yet many of New Zealand’s writers living overseas operated in a transnational way, taking advantage of colonial networks in a way that belies any notion of a single national allegiance. Most who left New Zealand, even if they were away for a time, continued to write about and interact with their homeland, and in many cases came back. In this fascinating and clear-sighted book, Helen Bones offers a fresh perspective on some hoary New Zealand literary chestnuts.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 242


Dimensions: 150 x 230 mm


Publication Date: 20-02-2018


$35.00
Landfall 234

ISBN: 9781988531151

Author: David Eggleton Ed.    Publisher: Otago University Press

FEATURED ARTISTS James Robinson, Jenna Packer, Andrew McLeod AWARDS & COMPETITIONS Results of the Kathleen Grattan Award for Poetry 2017 and judge’s report by...


FEATURED ARTISTS James Robinson, Jenna Packer, Andrew McLeod AWARDS & COMPETITIONS Results of the Kathleen Grattan Award for Poetry 2017 and judge’s report by Bill Manhire, results of the Caselberg Trust International Poetry Prize and judge’s report by Riemke Ensing, results and winning essays from Landfall Essay Competition 2017, and judge’s report by David Eggleton WRITERS Alie Benge, Marianne Bevan, Tony Beyer, Owen Bullock, Kate Camp, Medb Charleton, H.E. Crampton, John Dennison, Doc Drumheller, Breton Dukes, Lynley Edmeades, Ben Egerton, Riemke Ensing, Sisilia Eteuati, Laurence Fearnley, Rachel J. Fenton, Rhian Gallagher, René Harrison, Ingrid Horrocks, Mark Anthony Houlahan, Stephanie Johnson, Judith Lofley, Owen Marshall, Samantha Montgomerie, Claire Orchard, Bob Orr, Kiri Piahana-Wong, Brian Potiki, Joanna Preston, Vaughan Rapatahana, Rebecca Reader, Sue Reidy, James Robinson, Ali Shakir, Kerrin P. Sharpe, Sarah Shirley, Carin Smeaton, Ruby Solly, Michael Steven, Mua Strickson-Pua, Tayi Tibble, Albert Wendt, Sue Wootton, Phoebe Wright REVIEWS Landfall Review Online: books recently reviewed Martin Edmond on Charles Brasch: Journals 1945–1957 ed. Peter Simpson Iain Sharp on Selected Poems by Ian Wedde Jenny Powell on Die Bibel and Collected Poems 1981–2016 by Michael O’Leary Johanna Emeney on The Arrow that Missed by Ted Jenner and The Ones Who Keep Quiet by David Howard Denis Harold on The New Animals by Pip Adams Charlotte Graham on The Suicide Club by Sarah Quigley Katie Pickles on The Great War for New Zealand: Waikato 1800–2000 by Vincent O’Malley Edmund Bohan on The World, the Flesh and the Devil: The life and opinions of Samuel Marsden in England and the Antipodes 1765–1838 by Andrew Sharp


Bind: paperback


Pages: 208


Dimensions: 165 x 215 mm


Publication Date: 15-11-2017


$30.00
Surrender

ISBN: 9781988531106

Author: Janet Charman    Publisher: Otago University Press

what did you eat willful Chang’e? – fly to the moon where no one hears you rabbiting on you won’t silence me by chopping the tree its white leaves and a n...


what did you eat willful Chang’e? – fly to the moon where no one hears you rabbiting on you won’t silence me by chopping the tree its white leaves and a night-dipped pen the fuel of my longevity As one of eight writers, poet Janet Charman was invited in 2009 to take part in a hectic, immersive literary residency in Hong Kong. Written out of this time of stimulating buzz, 仁 surrender chronicles the tensions, translations and literary crushes that ensue, with ever-present comedy. From this intense hothouse and these privileged constraints flow narrative poems that capture the creative and cultural dislocation of travel, with its petty irritants and constant surprises. Charman’s verse has always been distinguished by a combination of astute observation, compassion, pluck, vulnerability and willingness to poke fun at herself. – Iain Sharp In her laconic and original style, Janet Charman writes a body of work which sees [her] exploiting the motif of journeying to investigate the colonised land, past and present. – Siobhan Harvey


Bind: paperback


Pages: 118


Dimensions: 150 x 230 mm


Publication Date: 01-11-2017


$27.50
The March of the Foxgloves (HB)

ISBN: 9780473365837

Author: Karyn Hay    Publisher: Esom House Press

A late 19th century tale of triumph over obsession and humiliation. From award-winning writer, Karyn Hay, The March of the Foxgloves promises to be essential su...


A late 19th century tale of triumph over obsession and humiliation. From award-winning writer, Karyn Hay, The March of the Foxgloves promises to be essential summer reading. LONDON, 1893, and Frances Woodward is tormented by the restrictions of her puritanical father and the cruelties of 19th century narcissist, Benedict Hunt. Having meted out a particularly creative form of revenge upon Hunt, Frances transcends the social norms of the late-Victorian era and travels alone to the far-flung colony of New Zealand, where she is forced to look beyond the establishment life seemingly pre-ordained for her. Falling in with other artists and non-conformists, and inspired by the revolution in thinking brought about by heroic literary figures and social reformers of the time, Frances forges a new path of her own making.


Pages: 358


Dimensions: 160 x 236 mm


$45.00
A Suitable Time for Vengeance

ISBN: 9780995100206

Author: Edmund Bohan    Publisher: Lucano

London 1887: a year of Continental anarchist- and American-financed Fenian violence. The suspicious death of Patrick O’Rorke’s boyhood friend Tom O’Brien ...


London 1887: a year of Continental anarchist- and American-financed Fenian violence. The suspicious death of Patrick O’Rorke’s boyhood friend Tom O’Brien – the internationally famous tenor known as Tomaso Briani – propels the former colonial detective into dangerous places when he is called on to investigate by both Briani’s mysterious widow, the Contessa di Stephani, and ambitious but devious Detective Chief Inspector Wilson of Scotland Yard’s Special Branch, himself embroiled in the Yard’s own labyrinthine power struggles. As other old friends, enemies and ghosts from O’Rorke’s past in New Zealand, Ireland and America rise up again to haunt him, the alliance of a Fenian cell – led by his former professional rival Declan Burke and his mortal enemy Bogdan Lynskey – threatens his life and the lives of everyone close to him. The fast-moving action takes us from London’s fashionable Belgravia and Kensington to Ireland’s Limerick Town and O’Rorke’s birthplace, before reaching its midnight climax at the highwayman Tibbet’s Corner on Wimbledon Common, where a truth is finally revealed and a mortal shot is fired.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 204


Dimensions: 153 x 234 mm


Publication Date: 02-10-2017


$35.00
The Matter of Parihaka

ISBN: 9780994130433

Author: Edmund Bohan    Publisher: Lucano

In the aftermath of the invasion of Parihaka in November 1881, Inspector Patrick O’Rorke is appointed by the government to investigate allegations of police b...


In the aftermath of the invasion of Parihaka in November 1881, Inspector Patrick O’Rorke is appointed by the government to investigate allegations of police brutality laid by the influential Maori politician Hoani Te Pae. Before he leaves Christchurch for Wellington to begin, O’Rorke is called to the house of the well-to-do Albert Howard, following the seemingly routine theft of a valuable item from his collection. Undeterred by the hostility and obstruction of the Wellington police to his Parihaka investigation, and the fact that he finds himself increasingly becoming a pawn in a battle between two warring political factions, O’Rorke is determined to get to the bottom of the incident. And when Albert Howard is murdered, he uncovers a chilling link between the two enquiries. Edmund Bohan’s Inspector O’Rorke novel is set, like the others, in a vividly re-created colonial New Zealand. A skillfully woven blend of fact and fiction, it takes its protagonist from an elegant Thorndon mansion to the fetid slums of Ghuznee Street, from a downtown bordello to the houses of Parliament in a compellingly told tale of political and personal intrigue. AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY Edmund Bohan An accomplished biographer and novelist, Edmund Bohan was a finalist in the Montana New Zealand Book Awards in 1995 and again in 1999. His O’Rorke series of historical novels includes The Opawa Affair, The Dancing Man, The Matter of Parihaka, The Irish Yankee, A Present for the Czar and The Lost Taonga. A seventh, A Suitable Time for Vengeance is forthcoming in October this year. An honours graduate from the University of Canterbury, Bohan has 18 published titles and has also written and published historical non-fiction, given radio talks, written short stories and numerous articles. For 25 years he was one New Zealand’s most successful singers in Britain.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 192


Dimensions: 152 x 234 mm


Publication Date: 15-07-2017


$35.00
The Last Will and Testament of an Extremely Distinguished Dog

ISBN: 9781584236559

Authors: Eugene O'Neill, Mark Andresen    Publisher: Gingko Press

Those who have suffered the loss of a long-lived canine companion may take some solace in the classic prose poem by Eugene O’Neill – The Last Will and Testa...


Those who have suffered the loss of a long-lived canine companion may take some solace in the classic prose poem by Eugene O’Neill – The Last Will and Testament of an Extremely Distinguished Dog. Here, the poem, written from the point of view of O’Neill’s beloved Dalmatian Blemie, is accompanied by Mark Andresen’s equally sympathetic illustrations of dogs of various breeds. This illustrated eulogy is a balm for anyone who’s recently lost their dog, or a perfect gift for a friend in their time of loss. Andresen’s original drawings along with the words of America’s only Nobel Prize-winning playwright are a perfect match.


Bind: hardback


Pages: 16


Dimensions: 134 x 210 mm


Publication Date: 14-08-2017


$21.99
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