NZ (History) (34)

From Suffrage to a Seat in the House: The path to parliament for New Zealand women

ISBN: 9781988592268

Author: Jenny Coleman    Publisher: Otago University Press

New Zealand has always proudly worn its status of being the first country to enfranchise women. But not many know that it took a further 40 long years to get th...


New Zealand has always proudly worn its status of being the first country to enfranchise women. But not many know that it took a further 40 long years to get the first woman elected to Parliament. In fact women were not even entitled to stand as candidates in national elections until 1919 – 26 years after they won the right to vote in those elections. Even then there was resistance, with editor of the Auckland Star stating that it would open the way for ‘a class of aggressive females who, thirsting for publicity, would be constantly pushing themselves forward into positions for which they are in no sense fitted’. The journey ‘from the home to the House’ was a shamefully protracted one for New Zealand women, as many male parliamentarians who grudgingly accepted the franchise being extended to women staunchly resisted any further progress. Their political machinations and filibustering were highly effective. Eventually, with an additional 130,000 voters enrolled, politicians began to realise that women’s votes – and even women’s voices – mattered. However, it was not until 1933 that the first woman was elected to the New Zealand Parliament, when Elizabeth McCombs won the Lyttelton seat, following the death of her husband, the sitting MP. The history of women striving to share in governing the country, a neglected footnote in the nation’s electoral history, is now captured in this essential work by Jenny Coleman. She has drawn on a wide range of sources to create a rich portrayal of a rapidly evolving colonial society in which new ideas and social change were in constant friction with the status quo.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 338


Dimensions: 150 x 230 mm


Publication Date: 30-05-2020


Tags: History   NZ (History)   New Zealand
$45.00
Crossing The Lines

ISBN: 9781988592381

Author: Brent Coutts    Publisher: Otago University Press

In Crossing the Lines, Brent Coutts brings to light the previously untold history of New Zealand homosexual soldiers in World War II, drawing on the experiences...


In Crossing the Lines, Brent Coutts brings to light the previously untold history of New Zealand homosexual soldiers in World War II, drawing on the experiences of ordinary men who lived through extraordinary times. At the centre of the story are New Zealand soldiers Harold Robinson, Ralph Dyer and Douglas Morison, who shared a queer identity and love of performance. Through their roles as female impersonators in Kiwi concert parties in the Pacific and Egypt they found a place to live as gay men within the military forces, boosting the morale of personnel in the Pacific Campaign and, along the way, falling in love with some of the men they met. Crossing the Lines is a richly illustrated account that follows the men from their formative pre-war lives, through the difficult wartime years to their experiences living in a postwar London where they embraced the many new possibilities available. It is a story of strong friendships, the search for love and belonging as homosexuals within the military and civilian worlds, and the creation of the foundation of the queer community today.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 336


Dimensions: 170 x 240 mm


Publication Date: 07-08-2020


Tags: History   NZ (History)
$49.95
Merchant Miner Mandarin : The Life and Times of the Remarkable Choie Sew Hoy

ISBN: 9781988503097

Authors: Jenny Sew Hoy Agnew, Trevor Agnew    Publisher: Canterbury University Press

In 1869, a businessman from China’s Guangdong Province first set foot on New Zealand soil at Port Chalmers. It was the beginning of an illustrious career that...


In 1869, a businessman from China’s Guangdong Province first set foot on New Zealand soil at Port Chalmers. It was the beginning of an illustrious career that would change the shape of commerce and industry in Otago and Southland. ‘Merchant, Miner, Mandarin’ depicts the fascinating life of Choie Sew Hoy – from his early days in China before emigrating to Australia and then New Zealand, to his death in 1901 as one of Dunedin’s most prominent entrepreneurs. The store Choie Sew Hoy established in Dunedin’s Stafford Street was a huge success, while his revolutionary gold-dredging technology improved the fortunes of the gold-mining industry in Otago and Southland. He backed dredging, quartz crushing and hydraulic sluicing ventures in the goldfields of Ophir, Macetown, Skippers, Nokomai and the Shotover. Sharp as a razor, Sew Hoy was a visionary, able to spot opportunities no one else could, whether sending vast amounts of unwanted scrap metal from New Zealand back to China, or joining famous Taranaki businessman Chew Chong’s fungus export trade. Sew Hoy was also a local character, always elegantly dressed and with legendary success in horse racing. His self-assurance and charm gained him entry to the Chamber of Commerce, the Jockey Club, the Masons and even the Caledonian Society. A benefactor to many social causes, he supported hospitals and benevolent associations to help his fellow Chinese immigrants. When the success of the Chinese in New Zealand aroused hostility, he fought the prevalent racism and unfair government legislation of the day. A man of two worlds, Choie Sew Hoy was a success in both. Richly illustrated and deeply researched, ‘Merchant, Miner, Mandarin’ is both the compelling biography of one of the most distinguished figures of New Zealand business and an intriguing account of late 19th-century society, industry and race relations.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 288


Dimensions: 210 x 265 mm


Publication Date: 19-06-2020


$49.99
Thomas Potts of Canterbury Colonist and Conservationist

ISBN: 9781988592428

Author: Paul Star    Publisher: Otago University Press

In 1858 Canterbury settler Thomas Potts protested against the destruction of tōtara on the Port Hills near Christchurch. A decade later, as a member of Parliam...


In 1858 Canterbury settler Thomas Potts protested against the destruction of tōtara on the Port Hills near Christchurch. A decade later, as a member of Parliament, he made forest conservation a national issue. Through his writing he raised the then novel idea of protecting native birds on island reserves, and proposed the creation of national ‘domains’ or parks. As a pioneering colonist, acclimatist and runholder, however, Potts’ own actions threatened the very environments he sought to maintain. This makes him a fascinating subject as we confront present-day problems in balancing development and conservation. This book is about, and partly by, Potts, and through him about New Zealand and the course and consequences of colonisation. It describes and interprets his life, from his early years in England through to his 34 years in New Zealand. Excerpts from Potts’ vivid 1850s diary, written from close to the edge of European settlement, are published here for the first time. Thomas Potts of Canterbury also reproduces 11 long-forgotten essays by him from the 1880s, in which he reflected on the 1850s and what had happened since – both to New Zealand’s natural environment and to Māori and Pākehā. Sixteen pages of contemporary images supplement the text. Thomas Potts of Canterbury will appeal to anyone interested in the early history of Canterbury, in environmental change, and in early efforts in New Zealand towards conservation. It is a story of conflicting goals, magnificently exemplified in the life and writings of a man who strove, 150 years ago, to be both colonist and conservationist.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 342


Dimensions: 170 x 240 mm


Publication Date: 20-09-2020


$39.95
Ko Aotearoa Tatou We Are New Zealand An Anthology

ISBN: 9781988592527

Authors: James Norcliffe, Michelle Elvy, Paula Morris    Publisher: Otago University Press

In the aftermath of the Christchurch terrorist attacks of 15 March 2019, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern declared: ‘We are all New Zealanders.’ These words re...


In the aftermath of the Christchurch terrorist attacks of 15 March 2019, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern declared: ‘We are all New Zealanders.’ These words resonated, an instant meme that asserted our national diversity and inclusiveness and, at the same time, issued a rebuke to hatred and divisiveness. Ko Aotearoa Tātou | We Are New Zealand is bursting with new works of fiction, nonfiction, poetry and visual art created in response to the editors’ questions: What is New Zealand now, in all its rich variety and contradiction, darkness and light? Who are New Zealanders? The works flowed in from well-known names and new voices, from writers and artists from Kerikeri to Bluff. Some are teenagers still at school; some are in their eighties. Māori, Pākehā, Pasifika, Asian, new migrants, young voices, queer writers, social warriors … Aotearoa’s many faces are represented in this unique and important compendium. In a society where the arts, especially marginalised arts, are under threat, this anthology shows that creative work can explore, document, interrogate, re-imagine – and celebrate – who we are as citizens of this diverse country, in a diverse world. A list of all contributors can be found at https://wearenewzealand.org/.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 280


Dimensions: 165 x 210 mm


Publication Date: 20-10-2020


$39.95
Rape Myths As Barriers To Fair Trial Process

ISBN: 9781988503196

Author: Elisabeth McDonald    Publisher: Canterbury University Press

‘Rape Myths as Barriers to Fair Trial Process’ opens the courtroom door on rape trials to investigate how and why they re-traumatise complainants. Despite d...


‘Rape Myths as Barriers to Fair Trial Process’ opens the courtroom door on rape trials to investigate how and why they re-traumatise complainants. Despite decades of targeted law reform, adult complainants still report that the process of being a witness is a significant point of re-victimisation. This book contains the findings of four years of research that compares the trial process in 30 adult rape cases from 2010 to 2015 (in which the defence at trial was consent) with 10 cases from the Sexual Violence Court Pilot heard in 2018. The aim of the research was to find out at which points in the questioning process the complainant displayed heightened emotionality, including distress, and why cross-examination (in particular) is so resistant to reform measures. Researchers also considered the extent to which the current rules of evidence and procedure are applied appropriately and consistently, and identified examples of best practice in order to develop proposals for changes to law and process. Elisabeth McDonald is a Professor of Law at the University of Canterbury. She has taught and published in the areas of sexual and family violence, law and sexuality, criminal law and the law of evidence for 30 years, as an academic and as the Policy Manager for the evidence law reference at the New Zealand Law Commission. Elisabeth is the author of a number of evidence law textbooks and online legal resources, as well as co-editor of ‘From “Real Rape” to Real Justice’ (2011) and ‘Feminist Judgments Aotearoa: Te Rino, the Two-Stranded Rope’ (2017). In June 2018, she became a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit for Services to Law and Education.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 584


Dimensions: 210 x 296 mm


Publication Date: 03-06-2020


Tags: July 2020   History   NZ (History)   Reference
$139.99
Bus Stops On The Moon : Red Mole Days 1974-1980

ISBN: 9781988592510

Author: Martin Edmond    Publisher: Otago University Press

Bus Stops on the Moon is a personal and a cultural history. As memoir, it is a sequel to The Dreaming Land (2015). A troubled and restless young Martin Edmond i...


Bus Stops on the Moon is a personal and a cultural history. As memoir, it is a sequel to The Dreaming Land (2015). A troubled and restless young Martin Edmond is on his way to becoming the wiser, older man who will sit down and write both narratives. As cultural history, the book gives us a participant’s-eye view of the early years of Alan Brunton and Sally Rodwell’s avant-garde theatre troupe Red Mole. Formed in 1974, Red Mole performed Dadaesque cabaret, agit-prop, costume drama, street theatre, circus and puppetry, live music, and became a national sensation. They toured the country with Split Enz and travelled internationally. One of Red Mole’s five founding principles was ‘to escape programmed behaviour by remaining erratic’. They ticked that one off. In Bus Stops on the Moon Martin Edmond offers, with his customary elegance, a rich and entertaining picture of the high times and low lives of Red Mole.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 274


Dimensions: 170 x 240 mm


Publication Date: 11-09-2020


Tags: Biography   NZ (History)
$39.95
House of Treasures - 150 Objects from Canterbury Museum Nga Taonga Tuku Iho

ISBN: 9780473522926

Authors: James Herries Beattie, Et Al    Publisher: Canterbury Museum

Since first opening its doors to the public on Rolleston Avenue on 1 October 1870, Canterbury Museum has come to house an estimated 2.3 million taonga (treasure...


Since first opening its doors to the public on Rolleston Avenue on 1 October 1870, Canterbury Museum has come to house an estimated 2.3 million taonga (treasures). To celebrate the Museum’s 150th anniversary, 150 taonga (treasures) from this vast collection are showcased in a superbly designed and photographed book House of Treasures: 150 Objects from Canterbury Museum Ngā Taonga Tuku Iho. The featured taonga speak of the depth and breadth of the collection and honour the generations of staff, volunteers and visitors who have made the Museum the remarkable and much-loved place that it is today. From the smallest to the largest, from the beautiful to the bizarre, from the tragic to the humorous, from local taonga to those created far, far away, the objects in House of Treasures tell an extraordinary story of natural and human history, and of Canterbury Museum itself.


Bind: hardback


Pages: 348


Dimensions: 250 x 300 mm


Publication Date: 01-10-2020


$69.95
A Long Time Coming : The Story of Ngai Tahu's Treaty Settlement Negotiations With The Crown

ISBN: 9781988503110

Author: Martin Fisher    Publisher: Canterbury University Press

The Ngāi Tahu settlement, like all other Treaty of Waitangi settlements in Aotearoa New Zealand, was more a product of political compromise and expediency than...


The Ngāi Tahu settlement, like all other Treaty of Waitangi settlements in Aotearoa New Zealand, was more a product of political compromise and expediency than measured justice. The Ngāi Tahu claim, Te Kerēme, spanned two centuries, from the first letter of protest to the Crown in 1849 to the final hearing by the Waitangi Tribunal between 1987 and 1989, and then the settlement in 1998. Generation after generation carried on the fight with hard work and persistence and yet, for nearly all Ngāi Tahu, the result could not be called fair. The intense negotiations between the two parties, Ngāi Tahu and the Crown, were led by a pair of intelligent, hard-nosed rangatira, who had a constructive but often acrimonious relationship – Tipene O’Regan and the Minister of Treaty Negotiations Doug Graham – but things were never that simple. The Ngāi Tahu team had to answer to the communities back home and iwi members around the country. Most were strongly supportive, but others attacked them at hui, on the marae and in the media, courts and Parliament. Graham and his officials, too, had to answer to their political masters. And the general public – interested Pākehā, conservationists, farmers and others – had their own opinions. In this measured, comprehensive and readable account, Martin Fisher shows how, amid such strong internal and external pressures, the two sides somehow managed to negotiate one of the country’s longest legal documents. ‘A Long Time Coming’ tells the extraordinary, complex and compelling story of Ngāi Tahu’s treaty settlement negotiations with the Crown. But it also shines a light, for both Māori and Pākehā, on a crucial part of this country’s history that has not, until now, been widely enough known. Author: Martin Fisher was born in Hungary and grew up in Canada and New Zealand. He has a BA (Hons) from the University of Otago, an MA from McGill University, and a PhD from Victoria University of Wellington, all in history. Martin worked as an academic tutor for a range of courses in history, political studies and management. He also worked in the Treaty of Waitangi claims process, first as a researcher for the Office of Treaty Settlements and the Crown Forestry Rental Trust, and then from 2012 to 2014 as a research analyst/inquiry facilitator at the Waitangi Tribunal. He joined the Ngāi Tahu Research Centre at the University of Canterbury as a lecturer in 2014.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 224


Dimensions: 155 x 230 mm


Publication Date: 12-10-2020


$39.99
A Business Revolution : The First Two Decades of National Business Review 1970-1991

ISBN: 9780994136091

Author: Hugh Rennie    Publisher: Fraser Books

In 1970, National Business Review, commenced publication. This innovative, under-resourced, but courageous fortnightly tabloid had a small initial impact, but w...


In 1970, National Business Review, commenced publication. This innovative, under-resourced, but courageous fortnightly tabloid had a small initial impact, but within five years was a major weekly publication. Grouped around it were other magazines, books, and newsletters. Launched by young entrepreneur Henry Newrick, it had editorial input from many of the young journalists of the 1960s. NBR became essential business reading while opening a new market to advertisers and setting new standards in journalism. This memoir, written by one of its founding writers (and the lawyer who fought off legal attacks for many years), is much more than just the story of NBR. It discusses major changes in New Zealand society, politics, the economy, and investigative journalism. It chronicles the way in which a few young New Zealanders with ambition but no money, grew an enterprise which attracted a succession of owners, gained millions in value, and led to its Fairfax-funded launch as a daily paper in1987 which lasting four years. The early lives of many who are now well-known included work for NBR. Its editors from Barrie Saunders, Reg Birchfield and Ian F.Grant, to Bob Edlin,Nevil Gibson, Colin James, Jim Eagles, and Warren Berryman set new standards for business reporting. The two decades end with the departure of the last of the innovators, the defeat of Fairfax’s bold plans, and its sale to a new owner. NBR returned to a weekly paper which lasted almost another 30 years in print and is still published online. The first two decades of publishing had many exciting times, all captured in this book. The Author: Hugh Rennie is a lawyer who was one of NBR’s initial editorial team, stepping aside for Barrie Saunders who became the first editor, but remaining involved to the end of the second decade. A Wellington lawyer and company director, and a writer, he has drawn on his own knowledge of the early years, the recollections of others, surviving company records, and private sources. Much of the information has not been published previously, and the book is extensively illustrated with contemporary material.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 206


Dimensions: 170 x 240 mm


Publication Date: 30-10-2020


$35.00
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